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Your Newborn: 20 Tips for the First 20 Days

Your newborn is only a few weeks old, and you have no idea what to do next. Your friends tell you one thing.
Your Newborn_ 20 Tips for the First 20 Days-min

Your newborn is only a few weeks old, and you have no idea what to do next. Your friends tell you one thing, your family members are telling you another, but who should you listen to? Your newborn may be too young for words, but there’s still plenty of advice they need from day 1! This blog post will discuss 20 tips that parents can follow when their new little bundle of joy arrives.

  • Your newborn is only a few weeks old, and you have no idea what to do next. Your friends tell you one thing, your family members are telling you another, but who should you listen to? Your newborn may be too young for words, but there’s still plenty of advice they need from day one! This blog post will discuss 20 tips that parents can follow when their new little bundle of joy arrives.

  • Clothes: Make sure they’re always clean with the appropriate clothing size on hand. Always keep clothes nearby in case accidents happen at home or during visits outside the house. It’s also important to make sure socks stay on, so toes don’t get cold (or worse). Remember that babies grow quickly so that sizes will change. Your child might not fit the same size clothes for long, and you’ll have to buy new ones often.

  • The first few days are all about feeding your newborn on demand (and night feedings). Give 18-24 ounces of breast milk or formula every day in 24 hours during this time frame – usually 17+ hours at one sitting, then an additional three feedings in an interval consistent with breastfeeding mothers’ patterns: before breakfast, after lunch, before dinner. You can offer water if your baby needs more liquids but avoid fruit juice until six months old! Your infant’s stomach isn’t big enough yet for anything other than breastmilk or formula. It may be frustrating to get the hang of breastfeeding and pumping, but it’s worth it! Your baby will have a higher chance of being healthy in the long run.

  • Your newborn needs to be changed often at first – every two hours is a good start until they’re older (every three or four). Your newborn should also stay dry for about six hours before they go into another daily wet diaper. Please make sure you get help from family members so that new parents don’t burn out too quickly after their big day!

  • Crib Safety: Keep all objects far away from cribs with no pillows, blankets, toys, etcetera within reach of your infant. Place them on shelves well above head height instead for safety purposes. This way, if babies start to wiggle, they won’t hit themselves on the head with objects. Your baby’s crib should only contain your child and a fitted sheet for sleeping!

  • Your newborn will sleep about 16 hours out of the day – a significant change from what you were used to before they were born (you may have been accustomed to getting eight hours at night). Your newborn might also sleep during feedings in between naps, so don’t worry if this happens occasionally.

  • Your pediatrician is an excellent resource for any questions that arise when caring for your new infant: ask them about anything from feeding schedules and nap times through diaper changing habits (every two hours), how often babies need baths, growth spurts, vaccinations and more. Your pediatrician will also help you establish a regular doctor’s visit schedule and make sure your baby develops on time.

  • Your newborn needs to be changed often at first – every two hours is a good start until they’re older (every three or four). Your newborn should also stay dry for about six hours before they go into another daily wet diaper. Please make sure you get help from family members so that new parents don’t burn out too quickly after their big day!

  • Crib Safety: Keep all objects far away from cribs with no pillows, blankets, toys, etcetera within reach of your infant. Place them on shelves well above head height instead for safety purposes. This way, if babies start to wiggle, they won’t hit themselves on the head with objects. Your baby’s crib should only contain your child and a fitted sheet for sleeping!

  • Your newborn will sleep about 16 hours out of the day – a significant change from what you were used to before they were born (you may have been accustomed to getting eight hours at night). Your newborn might also sleep during feedings in between naps, so don’t worry if this happens occasionally.
  • Your pediatrician is an excellent resource for any questions that arise when caring for your new infant: ask them about anything from feeding schedules and nap times through diaper changing habits (every two hours), how often babies need baths, growth spurts, vaccinations and more. Your pediatrician will also help you establish a regular doctor’s visit schedule and make sure your baby develops on time.

  • Your newborn needs to be changed often at first – every two hours is a good start until they’re older (every three or four). Your newborn should also stay dry for about six hours before they go into another daily wet diaper. Please make sure you get help from family members so that new parents don’t burn out too quickly after their big day!

  • Crib Safety: Keep all objects far away from cribs with no pillows, blankets, toys, etcetera within reach of your infant. Place them on shelves well above head height instead for safety purposes. This way, if babies start to wiggle, they won’t hit themselves on the head with objects. Your baby’s crib should only contain your child and a fitted sheet for sleeping!

Conclusion:

This blog post has 20 things that parents should know about during the first few days of their newborn’s life. Your newborn will sleep a lot, and it is important to keep all objects out of reach for safety reasons, so babies don’t hurt themselves if they start to wiggle around.

Your pediatrician can also help you with any questions and concerns you have regarding your infant, such as feeding schedules or how often an infant needs baths. Your baby may need to change more than every two hours at first unless they stop wetting diapers after six hours which means you’ll need some family members’ help! If there are no toys in the crib, your baby won’t injure himself on anything because of his body.